Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Bramble is an online platform aimed at connecting students wanting to sell or buy textbooks, as well as physical and electronic notes. This not only allows students to earn an extra income, but it also makes the learning process a whole lot easier.

As students ourselves, we understand the real life of a student and we hope to give you more room for the good life, more time for studying and, most importantly, more money at the end of the month.

The Bramble platform has one major beneficiary,

– the students.

We hope that the creation of a platform that allows students to set their own prices will allow shopping for textbooks to be more affordable and less stressful.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt International 

Kalk Bay harbour parking area gets a facelift

Kalk Bay harbour parking area gets a facelift

From: the City Of Cape Town

23 February 2018

The parking area at the Kalk Bay harbour has received a much-needed facelift. Apart from the newly surfaced parking layout, the City’s Transport and Urban Development Authority (TDA) has added paved walkways to the rocky shoreline along with benches, streetlights, and a recreational area for markets, fairs, and exhibitions during community events.

The upgrade of the Kalk Bay harbour parking area formed part of the Main Road rehabilitation project which included the restoration of parking areas along this scenic route from Muizenberg to Clovelly in the Far South.

‘At first glance the upgrade of the parking area at the Kalk Bay harbour may not seem that important, but the revitalisation of this area makes a huge difference to the local community and visitors. Previously the traffic along Main Road would back up considerably with long queues forming due to the constrained parking conditions at the harbour.

‘We have improved the access to the parking area by formalising the layout with asphalt surfacing and line markings. These measures assist with traffic flow along Main Road which is very busy during the tourist season, over weekends, and during peak hour periods on weekdays,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

An important aspect of the rehabilitation project was to increase the versatility of the area through intelligent urban design, and additional features.

‘We have, for example, added a play area for children, as well as a paved recreational area next to the parking area which can be used for markets, fairs, exhibitions, and other community events. We have installed benches along the walkways to the rocky shore where visitors can watch the sunrise over False Bay and Simon’s Town in the distance.

‘Again, the walkways may not seem that significant but, coupled with additional streetlights and the benches, the features make this area more accessible to the public so that they can fully enjoy the natural beauty of this space with its 360 degree views,’ said Councillor Herron.

New red brick stairs lead from the parking area to the lower section of the harbour.

‘The retaining wall is cladded with sandstone that was excavated during the rehabilitation of Main Road in prior months. Previously, visitors had to walk around the parking area and in the traffic to get to the lower section of the harbour below. Thus, the steps provide safe and easier access to visitors,’ said Councillor Herron.

The local community was involved in this project right from the start.

‘We presented concepts to residents who made suggestions. Their contributions were taken into account and I am happy to say that we have received overwhelming support for this project. We can achieve a lot and can make this city even greater when we work together. I am confident that visitors and the local community will benefit from this upgrade for years to come,’ said Councillor Herron.

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Glencairn, the early years

Glencairn, the early years

Glencairn and the Else (also referred to as Els) river valley are located on the coast of False Bay, between Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town.

In 1743 the Dutch East India Company established an official station and anchorage at Simonstown. An early map, drawn in 1870, shows the course of the river which was originally known as the “Elze Rivier” (Burman 1962). Throughout the early days of the Cape settlement, Else Bay (Glencairn beach) was mainly known as the last hazard on the difficult road to Simon’s Town, and other than a few fisherman who trekked from the beach, it was little disturbed – Tredgold (1985)

In 1811 the farm Elsje’s River was granted to Christoffel Brand, its main product being vegetables. Another farm called Elsje’s Baai was operated as a tannery. There is no mention at this time of the earlier farm Hartenbosch which was located in the area now known as Da Gama. Further up the valley was the farm Brooklands, which was where the water treatment facilities are now located. – Tredgold (1985)

Welcome Farm incorporated the Welcome Glen suburb and Naval Sports Fields. At Welcome Farm there was a mill to which farmers brought their corn to be ground. The farms raised cattle and grew vegetables – Tredgold (1985)

First resident, John Brown and his family settled in Elsje’s Bay in about 1875 – Tredgold (1985)

In the 1890s Stegman built his beach house on the Glencairn Heights side of the valley – Tredgold (1985)

The Glencairn residents built a tennis court in 1922 – Tredgold (1985)

In the 1920s the tidal pool was built – Tredgold (1985)

Glen Farm bought between the wars by W G Haines – Tredgold (1985)

Glen Cottage, 36 Glen Rd was used as Rest & Recreation by the military during the Boer War

56 plots sold on 23rd November 1901

The foundation stone of the church was laid in 1903, the hotel opened in 1904.

It is not known for certain how the former name of Glencairn, Else Bay, or the name of the Else River originated. Various theories are reviewed by Clifford (2003), favourite being that Rooi Els trees (Cunonia capensis) formerly grew along the river. However, none have been encountered during this study, and attempts by the local community to re-establish these trees in the vlei and lower river areas have largely proven unsuccessful. The second refers to a ship, the Esselstein, which stopped over in Simon’s Bay in 1671. Thereafter Simon’s Bay was referred to as Esselstein Bay, and the Else River as Esselstein River.

Cobern (1984) describes how a probable error in the transcription of maps could have led to the word ‘Elsestein’, the shortened version of which is ‘Else’. He further suggests that the careless translation of ‘Else Rivere’ from Dutch to French and finally to English, ‘Else’s River’, could have led to the further error, perpetuated to this day, of referring to Elsies River and Elsies Peak. Else Bay was later renamed Glencairn by its early Scottish residents, after the Glencairn area in the North of Scotland – (Clifford 2003).

The quarry was opened in 1898 (possibly earlier) adjacent to Main Road and the railway line. The quarry was operated by the Divisional Council and possibly closed between 1914 and 1918. Thereafter Strong and Moore re-equipped the workings and were still operating the quarry when it was closed in May 1978 due to environmental concerns, and appreciation of the tourist potential of the area.

The Cape Glass Company exploited the light grey sands found along the bottom of Glencairn Valley between 1902 and 1906. The industrial remains of the factory now form part of the Simon’s Town Museum’s collection.

The Cape Glass Company bought the railway siding built for the Salt River Cement Company and a narrow gauge cocopan that extended up the valley. The limited literature available on the company suggests that they were mining sand, but Clifford (2003) suggests that they were removing limestone. No evidence of its original presence remains.

Glencairn’s quicksands no longer exist and were stabilized by a change in the river’s discharge conditions caused by the construction of the railway embankment in 1890.

Glen Farm, dating from the 1800s stood where the warden’s house now stands. The de Villiers family lived in Welcome Farm and Glencairn Cottage, the de Villiers cemetery lies behind Glencairn Cottage.

Original farms were: Glen Farm, Welcome Glen, Oaklands and Brooklands

“Welcome Cottage Farm” by Lt Cdr (Mrs) D Visser. (undated) Simonstown Museum Files

Old flour mill with fine stonework and bricks dating from Batavian times1803-1806

Welcome Glen farm Deed of Grant completed in 1811, Welcome Cottage built between 1812 and 1815. it came into the possession of the de Villiers Family in 1871, remaining in the family for over a century. Over the years they produced vegetables, flowers, bark for tanning purposes and latterly, dairy produce. The land was sold to the Navy in 1970, except for 6 morgen on which the cottages stand. They were subsequently expropriated in 1974. Welcome Cottage no. 440 has been slightly altered by the addition of an enclosed stoep and a new roof, but otherwise remains unaltered with yellow wood beams, door and flooring, 5 triangular gables surmounted by pedimental caps.

Brown’s Cottage ca. 1890 possibly 124 Glen Rd.

Stegman’s cottages built in the 1892 by a farmer from Durbanville, who built a beach house at what is now 24 Fairburn Road

Bulletin Volume XIX No.2 Snippets from Old Simon’s Town July 1996

In 1928 there was a private Native Location near the old Glass Works. It consisted of 25 dwellings and a school (pg 37 Glencairn Mission School?). The Health inspector recommended it be closed and it was cleared in 1931.

The squatter-like shack community in what is now Glencairn Heights was associated with the Strong & Moore Quarry. The community was relocated under the Group Areas Act. A Wesslyan Mission School existed there years before, followed by a mission school and church.

From: Roger Jaques’ thesis

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The Echo of a Noise

The Echo of a Noise

Having performed alone on the stages of the world for well over seven thousand times, Pieter-Dirk Uys has learnt that every show is the first and the last performance – because each audience demands and gets a different energy, topicality and excitement. Now in his 71st year, he doesn’t glance back at the successes and failures that have strengthened his belief in a constant improvement of his work, but at those small signposts that throughout his life subconsciously have pointed him in a right and original direction – his father Hannes Uys, his mother Helga Bassel, his grandmothers, his teachers, his passions; Sophia Loren, censorship, false eyelashes and making a noise when everyone demanded silence.



South Africa’s foremost satirist sits on a barstool, wearing his black beanie on his head and his Almost Famous sweatshirt, and with his impish smile, he even looks like a naughty goblin trapped by the spotlight. Within minutes he fills the auditorium with his presence. This is just Pieter-Dirk Uys speaking and he opens his heart and talks about his private and public life. The big hair and silky repartee of Evita Bezuidenhout or the smoky drone of the sexy Bambi Kellermann have been stored elsewhere for some other time. It soon becomes clear that the title of his autobiographical one-man memoir, The Echo of a Noise, doesn’t really do justice to what he presents here. He leads you into his inner sanctuary, takes you through our history and shows where what is public and private meet.

Uys was and still is a voice in the wilderness, ever since he first appeared fearlessly on a stage in the 1970s. He jokes that the all-powerful censor board was his own personal public relations department. And how brilliantly they banned his work: even to the extent of declaring a word Uys invented as obscene, a word that they couldn’t find in any dictionary. We hear the recording of the voice of little Pietertjie Uys singing like an angel and accompanied on the piano by his father, Hannes Uys, whom he would accompany on Sundays to the church where Hannes was organist – the father whom he loved, but didn’t like very much; the sternest critic of his work and yet the one who could also give good advice. He tells of his father’s last moments, being with him as he died and then going back to the family home where Sannie, the housekeeper and his ‘Cape Flats mother’, asked if there wasn’t any washing from ‘Pa’. The audience is spellbound as he shares the suicide of his German mother, Helga, as well as the influences on him of his Afrikaans and German grandmothers.

It’s as if Uys constantly takes his audience into his confidence and so breaks all the rules and crosses boundaries. He remains a master storyteller who can make as much fun of himself as he does with the others who get a lashing from his sharp tongue.

Date: 18 March 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: The Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Water meter readings

Water meter readings

From the City of Cape Town:

Your home or business is connected to the City’s water network through a water meter, which usually sits in a small chamber under the pavement outside your property. We read your water meter once a month to calculate your monthly water and sewerage use.

How the City reads your water meter

The meter is read by a different person each month. We take a meter reading using a handheld computer terminal that contains core information about the property, such as the erf number and the address.

If we cannot read your meter (due to your gate being locked or other circumstances) and you do not submit your water reading, your bill will be an estimate based on your previous water use. All cost estimates will be reversed, if necessary, when we get an actual reading.

DID YOU KNOW?Well-run City: Each year, we replace about 9 000 old or malfunctioning water meters. 

You can help us get an accurate reading for your water meter by doing the following:

  • Make sure you know where your water meter is located.
  • Make sure it is not obstructed (e.g. by sand or weeds) and is easy to read.
  • Your water meter should be accessible to City officials at all times.
  • If your water meter is behind locked gates, or if dogs prevent the meter readers from taking a reading, you can submit the reading yourself (see below).
  • Alternatively, ask the City to relocate your meter to the outside of your house, via the City’s Service Requests application.

How to read your water meter

You can submit your water meter reading by calling 0860 103 089 or entering it online via your municipal account on our e-Services portal.

No matter the type of water meter, black numbers represent kilolitres and red numbers represent litres. As you are charged per kilolitre, only supply the black numbers when submitting your reading.


Inclusive City: The City has installed free-call phones at some City facilities to allow you to make enquiries and request services at no cost.

Water and sanitation tariffs

All formal properties have water meters, which we use to read your water consumption and calculate your monthly bill. However, there are different tariffs for residences, businesses, and other organisations.

  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation in your home
  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation for your business or organisation

Report problems with your water meter

If your water meter is not being read regularly, is malfunctioning or needs to be relocated to outside of your property, please contact the City’s 24-hour call centre:

  • Call us on 0860 103 089 (choose option 2: water-related faults)
  • SMS: 31373 (max of 160 characters)
  • Whatsapp: 063 407 3699
  • Email:

You can also go to our service requests portal and report or request an issue online. If you need some help with how to place a service request or report an issue, please see Submit a service request.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Muizenberg, Looking Back

Muizenberg, Looking Back

The village of Muizenberg was established by the Dutch in 1743 as a military post on the road between Cape Town and Simon’s Town. It was named after Wynand Willem Muijs, sergeant in charge of the post in 1844, and later commander of the Cape garrison. The railway line from Wynberg reached Muizenberg on 15 December 1882.

Muizenberg was initially merely a halt on the long road between Table Bay and Simon’s Bay, a turnpike/toll (the first in the country) and a military watch. The small, rather shambolic, but historically pivotal Battle of Muizenberg in 1795 led to the British taking initial control over the Cape from the Dutch (finally cemented at the Battle of Blaauwberg).

The remnants of the fort of that battle can still be visited. But it was only in the 1820s that the establishment of an inn of rather dubious repute began the transformation of Muizenberg to the holiday resort it became. Called Farmer Pecks Inn, it became an important stopover for travellers on their way from Cape Town to Simon’s Town, and raised the entertainment profile of the area. They put up the first bathing box. Other private bathing boxes began to appear (the strict social codes of bathing were a far cry from the casualness of today) and, with the arrival of the railway by the late 1800s, land was sold for residential development and people were thronging to the white sands of Muizenberg, immortalised by regular visitor Rudyard Kipling in his poem ‘The Flowers’: “Buy a bunch of weed/ White as the sand of Muizenberg/Spun before the gale”.

Added impetus was provided by Cecil John Rhodes, who built a house there and encouraged his friends and colleagues to do the same. The arrival of the new mining magnates from Kimberley and Johannesburg provided a shimmering seal of approval, and many of their mansions can still be viewed along what was then known as Millionaires Row.

After the Anglo-Boer War, the area was considered a good tonic for soldiers, and the town began to pay proper attention to its popularity with new bathing boxes, pavilions and a handsome new Edwardian railway station befitting its status. In 1911, the first aeroplane to deliver mail in South Africa made its maiden voyage to the postmaster at Muizenberg. The village was transformed.

Although Muizenberg lost its premier resort status in the 1970s, the sand and sea are as attractive now as they were then. The village retains much of its charm and many historic buildings have been restored. A major Muizenberg attraction is surfing: considered a very long, mellow wave, and especially good for those learning to surf as well as for the longboarding fraternity, it follows the traditions of being the birthplace of prone surfing on wooden belly-boards in South Africa in 1910, and then the first stand-up surfing in 1919. Mystery author Agatha Christie visited the beach in 1922, surfing in her green wool bathing suit. Famous Irish playwright and author George Bernard Shaw was photographed surfing at Muizenberg in 1932, at the age of 75.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


Per Thornberg & Dan Shout at Casa Labia

Per Thornberg & Dan Shout at Casa Labia

Casa Labia presents a jazz performance by Swedish saxophonist, Per Thornberg and South African saxophonist, Dan Shout, along with Andrew Lilley on piano, Charles Lazar on double bass and Kevin Gibson on drums.

Tenor saxophonist, Thornberg, is a jazz musicians of note from Halmstad, Sweden. He has played jazz/improvised music for 30 years from solo/duo settings to big band. He has performed with Lars Jansson, Bobo Stenson, Yasuhito Mori and more, and has performed as a guest artist in Denmark, Norway, France, SA, Italy, Spain, Germany, Australia, USA and the UK.

Shout is a respected, sought-after jazz musician, educator and business owner based in Cape Town. He has performed in over 30 countries across five continents with the likes of Johnny Clegg, Winston Mankunku, Maria Schneider and more.

Venue: Casa Labia, 192 Main Rd, Muizenberg, Cape Town
Time: 8pm to 9pm
Cost: R150 (bookings via phone or email)

Date: 25 February 2018

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Join physicist-philosopher-pianist Philip Southey for an unforgettable romp through quantum physics, improvised classical music and tantric philosophy, as we explore some of the weird ways we make sense of our world. “Electron”, “Major 7th”, “Orgasm” and “Orange” are just some of the “things” we’ll explore in in this theatrical symphony.


Philip has played bagpipes for the queen. He also graduated with a BSc Astrophysics from UCT and a BA Philosophy from Oxford University. Born in Cape Town, he enjoys a special connection with the porcupines of Table Mountain, and playing the piano is his favourite hobby and pious pursuit. He is in his second last year (the second year to be called his “last year”) of a PhD in Physics Education at UCT.

Date: 3 march 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape town South

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr first came to national prominence in the southern-rock blues band Baxtop, where he shared guitar duties with Larry Amos in the Joburg club scene of 1976. Rising quickly to the top of the national circuit and winning the SABC battle of the bands, they recorded “Work it Out” for Warner Brothers in 1979, which remains an enduring SA classic.

Tim then formed Ella Mental with Heather Mac, which was one of the iconic 80’s bands to have a string of radio hits in South Africa playing many of the countries top festivals. When the SA scene imploded they relocated to Ireland for 7 years. Tim then returned to South Africa to form the Zap Dragons who gigged hard throughout that emotional period in SA’s history. His solo album “Still Standing” is a brilliant mix of country, pop, blues, soul and rock with the title track a firm favourite among SA audiences.

The common thread throughout all these projects has been Tim’s expressive and soulful guitar playing, and unlike many guitarists his rhythm and textural playing is as distinctive as his lead work. New songs and albums are in the pipeline including some that will feature his piano playing, and we look forward to hearing more from this natural musician and songwriter in his ongoing journey.

Date: 25 February 2018

Time: 4 PM – 7 PM

Venue: Cape To Cuba, 165 Main Rd, Kalkbay.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Les Liaisons Dangereuses

Les Liaisons Dangereuses

“Les Liaisons Dangereuses” is a drama by Christopher Hampton based on the novel by Choderlos de Laclos written in 1782. It has also been described as an amoral story. The book was viewed as scandalous at the time of its initial publication.

It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two rivals (and ex-lovers) who use seduction as a weapon to socially control and exploit others. It depicts the decadence of the French aristocracy shortly before the French Revolution, thereby exposing the perversions of the so-called Ancien Régime.

Christopher Hampton’s 1985 adaptation, opened in London’s West End and in 1987 crossed over to Broadway with Alan Rickman originating the role of the Vicomte de Valmont, Lindsay Duncan as Marquise de Merteuil, and Juliet Stevenson as Madame de Tourvel.

The 1988 film adaptation by Stephen Frears starring Glenn Close, John Malkovich and Michelle Pfeiffer was nominated for multiple Academy Awards including Best Picture. Many other film adaptations were made and set in various locations and time frames.

Date:  22 February – 3 March 2018

Time: 8 PM – 10:30 PM

Venue: Masque Theatre, 37 Main Road Muizenberg.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South