Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Join physicist-philosopher-pianist Philip Southey for an unforgettable romp through quantum physics, improvised classical music and tantric philosophy, as we explore some of the weird ways we make sense of our world. “Electron”, “Major 7th”, “Orgasm” and “Orange” are just some of the “things” we’ll explore in in this theatrical symphony.

 

Philip has played bagpipes for the queen. He also graduated with a BSc Astrophysics from UCT and a BA Philosophy from Oxford University. Born in Cape Town, he enjoys a special connection with the porcupines of Table Mountain, and playing the piano is his favourite hobby and pious pursuit. He is in his second last year (the second year to be called his “last year”) of a PhD in Physics Education at UCT.

Date: 3 march 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape town South

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr first came to national prominence in the southern-rock blues band Baxtop, where he shared guitar duties with Larry Amos in the Joburg club scene of 1976. Rising quickly to the top of the national circuit and winning the SABC battle of the bands, they recorded “Work it Out” for Warner Brothers in 1979, which remains an enduring SA classic.

Tim then formed Ella Mental with Heather Mac, which was one of the iconic 80’s bands to have a string of radio hits in South Africa playing many of the countries top festivals. When the SA scene imploded they relocated to Ireland for 7 years. Tim then returned to South Africa to form the Zap Dragons who gigged hard throughout that emotional period in SA’s history. His solo album “Still Standing” is a brilliant mix of country, pop, blues, soul and rock with the title track a firm favourite among SA audiences.

The common thread throughout all these projects has been Tim’s expressive and soulful guitar playing, and unlike many guitarists his rhythm and textural playing is as distinctive as his lead work. New songs and albums are in the pipeline including some that will feature his piano playing, and we look forward to hearing more from this natural musician and songwriter in his ongoing journey.

Date: 25 February 2018

Time: 4 PM – 7 PM

Venue: Cape To Cuba, 165 Main Rd, Kalkbay.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Les Liaisons Dangereuses

Les Liaisons Dangereuses

“Les Liaisons Dangereuses” is a drama by Christopher Hampton based on the novel by Choderlos de Laclos written in 1782. It has also been described as an amoral story. The book was viewed as scandalous at the time of its initial publication.

It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two rivals (and ex-lovers) who use seduction as a weapon to socially control and exploit others. It depicts the decadence of the French aristocracy shortly before the French Revolution, thereby exposing the perversions of the so-called Ancien Régime.

Christopher Hampton’s 1985 adaptation, opened in London’s West End and in 1987 crossed over to Broadway with Alan Rickman originating the role of the Vicomte de Valmont, Lindsay Duncan as Marquise de Merteuil, and Juliet Stevenson as Madame de Tourvel.

The 1988 film adaptation by Stephen Frears starring Glenn Close, John Malkovich and Michelle Pfeiffer was nominated for multiple Academy Awards including Best Picture. Many other film adaptations were made and set in various locations and time frames.

Date:  22 February – 3 March 2018

Time: 8 PM – 10:30 PM

Venue: Masque Theatre, 37 Main Road Muizenberg.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

International Childhood Cancer Day

International Childhood Cancer Day

February 15, 2018

International Childhood Cancer Day which highlights the need for concerted global actions to address the growing challenge posed by this non-communicable disease. Globally, childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases, as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

It is a day when we come together to continue the work to “Advance Cures and Transform Care” and to make childhood cancer a national and global child health priority.

Much work remains to be done. According to IARC (2015), the reported worldwide incidence of childhood cancer is increasing, from 165,000 new cases annually to 215,000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85,000 new cases for 15-19 year-olds. Many more remain uncounted and unreported due to a lack of childhood cancer registries in a large number of countries.

While the number of children with cancer is much less compared to global incidence of adult cancers, the number of lives saved is significantly higher; survival rates in high-income countries reach an average of 84% and are steadily improving even in less-resourced areas of the world where there is local and international support.

The ICCD campaign’s ultimate goal and unified message is “Advance Cures and Transform Care”. This message spotlights the inequities and glaring disparity of access to care in most low- and middle-income countries where 80% of children with cancer live. Children and adolescents in Africa, Asia and Latin America and in parts of Eastern and Southern Europe do not yet have access to appropriate treatment including essential medicines and specialized care. Currently, where one lives often determines one’s ability to survive childhood cancer.

The 188 member organizations of Childhood Cancer International (CCI) in 96 countries as the largest non-profit patient support organization for childhood cancer and the 1000 healthcare professionals from 110 countries who are members of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ask everyone to come together in solidarity to make sure children and adolescents everywhere have the chance to survive cancer and live long, productive and meaningful lives.

“The chance for a cure, the chance to live, should not be an accident of geography. There is nothing scarier than realizing that your child has cancer. However, there is nothing more tragic than knowing that treatment and cure does exist for your particular child’s cancer and with excellent outcomes, BUT… that it is not available for your child. Why? Because your child happens to live in the wrong hemisphere! It is time to take action to stop this cruel atrocity… makes your voices heard on International Childhood Cancer Day and demand from world leaders to ACT and HELP SAVE ALL CHILDREN regardless of where they live!”
(HRH Princess Dina Mired, mother of childhood cancer survivor, President-elect, UICC).

 

For the next 3 years we will build on a campaign to:

  1. Build global awareness that more than 300,000 children each year are diagnosed with cancer.
  2. Build global awareness that many types of childhood cancer are curable if given:
    • The right to early and proper diagnosis;
    • The right to access life-saving essential medicines;
    • The right to appropriate and quality medical treatments, and;
    • The right to follow up care, services and sustainable livelihood opportunities for survivors.
  3. Work towards the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 to reduce premature mortality one-third by 2030.
    • Too often when it comes to childhood cancer we are faced with a response of “but.”
    • “But” there aren’t enough children to develop new drugs;
    • “But” the treatment is too expensive;
    • “But” there aren’t enough doctors,
    • “But” …

 

Ruth Hoffman, Global President, Childhood Cancer International

 

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

The Fish Hoek Story

The Fish Hoek Story

Author –Joy Cobern

Imagine living in the southern suburbs of Cape Town in the 1870s, where would you go for a day out and how would you get there? There were no cars and horses were expensive to keep unless you needed them for your business. Perhaps you knew someone with a horse and cart so, as a great treat you could go to Muizenberg beach. Then, in 1882, the railway was extended from Wynberg to Muizenberg and suddenly it became easy to have a day at the beach.

In those days Fish Hoek was a farm in the country with a beautiful but remote beach. In 1883 the railway line reached Kalk Bay but it was not until 1890 that it was extended to Simon’s Town passing along Fish Hoek beach. The owners of the farm, having seen Muizenberg become a fashionable resort after the arrival of the railway, could not have been pleased when the railway authorities wanted to purchase land for the line but they could not refuse. A station was built opposite what is now Windsor Lodge. This was just a wooden platform with no shelter from the south easter and it was not until about 1910, after many complaints from travellers that a small waiting room was built at each end of the platform.

At that time the owner of the Fish Hoek Farm was Hester de Villiers who lived in the farmhouse, on the site of the present Homestead Naval Mess, with her husband Izaak de Villiers. She had bought the farm in 1883. She was then fifty one years old, a teacher who, with her sister, had run a small school in Cape Town. For an unmarried lady of her age to buy property was very unusual, but she came to Fish Hoek and ran the farm on her own. At the age of sixty nine she married Jacob Izaak de Villiers who had a farm at Noordhoek. He left one of his sons to run his farm and came to run the Fish Hoek Farm with her.

Previous owners of the farm had mainly wanted it for the fishing rights, but Hester de Kock, as she was then, cultivated fields of wheat and vegetables and it was probably Hester who built the barn, now Mountain View cottages, this is the oldest building in Fish Hoek. As the farm expanded more water was needed so in 1902 she bought the water rights to the Kleintuin spring at Clovelly and pipes were laid to bring the water to Fish Hoek to irrigate the fields and supply the farmhouse.

The first official grant of land at Fish Hoek was made in 1818, by Lord Charles Somerset. One of the stipulations in that grant was that the beach should remain open to the public but as it was not easy to access the number of visitors was small. However, the building of the railway line changed that. It was now easy for the citizens of Cape Town to get on the train to Simon’s Town, get off at the Fish Hoek station, and walk, and perhaps picnic, on the beach. Izaak de Villiers kept a strict eye on them, any rowdy behaviour or leaving of litter and they would be immediately reprimanded. Talking to visitors it soon became obvious that many of them would like to be able to stay in the area. So Hester de Villiers started letting rooms in the farmhouse and, when this became popular converted the barn and the coach house to rooms. Uitkyk, the building on the site of the old whaling station, was converted to a holiday cottage and camping was allowed next to the barn. So it was that Hester de Villiers became our first Fish Hoek tourist entrepreneur.

Having no children of her own it seems that Hester had come to regard the eight children of Izaak’s first marriage as her own. In her will she left the farm to her husband but asked that on his death the land should be sold and the proceeds divided equally between all her step children but the farmhouse was left to her two step daughters. She left a sum of £150 “to be placed in the savings bank at Cape Town and used for the maintenance of the family cemetery”. She died in 1914 and Izaak in 1916. They are both, with other members of the family, buried in the family cemetery which is now beside the Dutch Reformed church in Fish Hoek, whose members look after it.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

The Clovelly Country Club Story

The Clovelly Country Club Story

SHORT HISTORY OF THE CLOVELLY COUNTRY CLUB

The idea of a club history has been in the minds of many connected with Clovelly for some time. Those who recall the Club in its early days when it was virtually a club without a clubhouse, and later, in the immedi­ately pre-War years when things were a little easier, during the War years, the post-War years, the post-fire years and so on, are convinced that Clovelly does have, moreover, a ‘history’ which thoroughly deserves the telling.

The writer of the present one has, indeed, told the Chairman that, although the name Clovelly was formerly nothing to her except a suburban railway station ‘somewhere out Fish Hoek way’, she has since realised that its history, for sheer drama, variety, and as a record of progress against seemingly overwhelming odds, beats that of the Crusades, the Norman Conquest, and the Great Trek.

Naturally she would not have been able to carry out this assignment had it not been for the co-operation of a great many people who gave up their time to tell her about the Club in other days. Pre-eminent among these were Mr I Joelson and Dr E Greenwall, together with a great many past Chairmen and others who had assisted in getting Clovelly on its feet, ladies who had been instrumental in building up the ladies’ bowling and golf sections and, of course, Phyllis and Maurice Bodmer. She was also fortunate in obtaining the co-operation of Westlake Golf Club, which made it possible for her to ‘fill in’ many of the details of the Club’s earliest history which would otherwise have been missing.

Our Club historian, Pat Dickson, says that there is very little to say about her – as yet – as she is a career girl who hasn’t had a career, at least not the one she wanted. She describes herself as being ‘on the run from the teaching profession’, having featured in the latter for eight years, first in her home town, East London, and then in the Cape, before she returned to the University of Cape Town to further her studies.

The purpose of this was to obtain qualifications which would enable her to move from high school teaching into teacher-training, but although she finally achieved this goal in 1972, becoming an instructor in a training ­school under the Administration of Coloured Affairs, the writing of two theses (the second being for a Master’s degree, obtained in 1970), in addition to the unexpected success she enjoyed as a free-lance writer of magazine articles during her post-graduate student days, convinced her that she would rather be a professional writer of business histories than a teacher, instructor, or lecturer in anything, to anybody.

In retailing, one speaks of the ‘target customer’.  In bringing out a history of this nature it is hoped to appeal to two kinds of ‘target readers’: the more senior members who actually lived through this history (and who may quarrel with certain details of the story at times!), and the newer members, who found a ‘ready-made’ club, and may have wondered how it got that way.

Clovelly is the embodiment of a certain spirit, compounded not only of good fellowship and a mutual interest in promoting the ends of sport, but also of a special kind of tolerance, and the determination that was needed in days gone by to maintain this good fellowship and this tolerance.

Other clubs may have their histories, but that of Clovelly, like the club itself, is unique. If therefore, those who have joined this Club since World War II would like to know why Clovelly is as it is, one hopes that they will find most of the answers by dipping into the Short History offered here.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

Distributed on behalf of David Pena, Valley North Neighbourhood Watch:

JOIN US FOR A MASS HIKE TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

Are you tired of the senseless violent attacks on the mountains and beaches?

Are you fed up with the criminals and perpetrators owning the mountains and beaches?

Are you tired of feeling unsafe and unable to even take a short walk into the mountains for fear of your and your family’s lives, thus being restricted to built up areas?

Do you feel for the victims and their families who have been devastated by the attacks?

We’re organising a hike up Elsie’s Peak next week Saturday 10 February, TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

The goal: To promote awareness, show solidarity for this common cause and show support for the victims of the recent attacks as well as their families.

To guarantee safety for you and your family there will be an armed response, neighbourhood watches present at the parking and on the route. SAPS will be informed of the event.

Table Mountain Security Action Group members will be present.

The established “Take Back Our Mountains” hiking group has been informed of and fully support this Elsies Peak Hike.

Bring the whole family, bring a smile and let’s enjoy the mountain the way that we are supposed to and is our right to!

We’re going to take back our mountains and beaches, one trail at a time!!

Let’s make it a big group, to make a proper statement and to break the shackles that have been placed on us!!!”

ALL WELCOME – PLEASE SHARE

When: Sat 10 Feb, 09:00

Where: Golconda Street, Glencairn Heights, Start of Elsies Peak trail.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Things to do this Valentine’s Day in Cape Town

Things to do this Valentine’s Day in Cape Town

Adore it or abhor it, you can’t escape the universal day of love. And while Valentine’s Day (14 February, for those who tend to forget) has become an age-old tradition defined by shop-bought red roses, heart-smattered teddy bears and boxes upon boxes of gooey chocolates, your personal Cupid-themed celebration doesn’t have to be quite so cliché. So, if you’re looking to spend Valentine’s Day in Cape Town (or any other amorous special occasion, for that matter), think outside the heart-shaped box and woo him or her with a truly inspired romantic escapade.

 

From incredible dinners and hotel stays to unique couples’ experiences and exclusive promos, here’s our pick of things to do this V-Day in Cape Town.

For More Information

Please note that booking is essential at each venue

SOME MORE ROMANTIC IDEAS AND EVENTS

Keep an eye out for some cool date ideas and a great selection of romantic things to do in Cape Town.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

“Water saving features such as storage tanks, water efficiency devices, and boreholes in particular are unsurprisingly proving to be major selling features in Cape Town South, as property buyers are looking at the water problem as a long-term issue”, says Andre de Villiers, veteran Southern Suburbs real estate agent and owner of the Cape Town South group of four Chas Everitt offices.

“We are accordingly highlighting properties that we are marketing that feature such benefits as they definitely an attraction and we are of the opinion that for those interested in selling their property any such measures are well worth the additional investment to enhance the appeal and increase the competitive appeal and to protect one’s property value. We had a similar situation with load shedding and power saving devices not that long ago but with water-related issues there seems to be a greater value attached as it is not being seen as a temporary problem.”

“Pools are being seen as far less of an advantage and more of a hassle to be dealt with and water-wise gardens are also attracting a lot of positive discussions,” said de Villiers.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town Creative Saturday

Cape Town Creative Saturday

Enjoy a bit of literary fun with All About Writing and Slow Life when we present our Creative Saturdays at Casa Labia in Muizenberg.

Be inspired by the cry of gulls as you release your creativity, build your confidence and allow your imagination to take flight.

 

This workshop will be of equal benefit to more experienced writers wanting to augment their skills, and to those with no experience at all, who are looking for a place to start.

It will be presented by author Jo-Anne Richards.

Cost: R350 per session (payable in advance) The price includes muesli or scrambled egg on seed loaf breakfast + coffee/tea on arrival and coffee/tea mid morning. Book for all six 2018 sessions and pay for only five. Save R350

ADVANCE BOOKING VIA THE SHOP ESSENTIAL

PLEASE BOOK AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. WE FILL UP FAST

Jo-Anne Richards is an internationally published novelist with a PhD in Creative Writing from Wits University. She has run the Honours programme and taught writing skills in the Wits University Journalism Department for fifteen years and has supervised in the Wits Creative Writing Masters. With Richard Beynon, she founded All About Writing in 2007 and they run a number of courses in creative writing as well as in journalism and narrative journalism. 

Where: Casa Labia, Main Rd, Muizenberg
When: 3 February, 14 April, 2 June, 4 August, 6 October, 1 December 2018
Time: 9.30 to 12.30 pm

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South